Home News UNDERSTANDING THE CONSEQUENCES OF FAILING THE NMC OSCE FOR OVERSEAS NURSES

UNDERSTANDING THE CONSEQUENCES OF FAILING THE NMC OSCE FOR OVERSEAS NURSES

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It was explained that the Objective Structured Clinical Examination, commonly known as the OSCE, serves as the conclusive assessment required by the NMC for overseas nurses seeking registration as nurses in the UK. The most recent iteration of the OSCE, as of 2021, mandates ten stations where candidate nurses are observed while demonstrating their skills and knowledge. This process bears resemblance to the return demonstration tests undergone by Filipino nurses in the Philippines, albeit with the distinction that UK OSCE candidates are obliged to verbalize each step demonstrated during the examination. The previous version of the OSCE, referred to as the Legacy OSCE, comprising merely six stations, is anticipated by the NMC to remain in effect only until July 31, 2022. For overseas nurses, the OSCE stands as the primary obstacle they must surmount upon embarking on their nursing journey in the UK.

The online Filipino nursing community has shared numerous success stories regarding the OSCE and offered abundant content on strategies for passing it with flying colours. However, there is minimal discussion about the consequences of failing the OSCE.

It was clarified that the OSCE, according to its grading criteria, yields either a pass or fail outcome, devoid of any numerical scoring akin to the Philippine Nursing Licensure Exam. Candidates receive their OSCE results via email within a few days following the examination.

Regarding a pass outcome, it signifies a favourable result leading to subsequent registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council of the UK, thereby granting overseas nurses’ eligibility for a qualified nurse’s salary, albeit with heightened responsibilities, typically corresponding to Band 5 within the NHS. Furthermore, registration necessitates the payment of an annual fee; failure to comply risks the loss of nursing practice rights. Registration must also undergo revalidation every three years to avoid suspension or revocation of the nursing license in the UK.

In the event of a failure, the situation is more nuanced than a simple pass. A partial failure may occur if a candidate overlooks minor details during the examination, resulting in failure only in the specific section or station. A partial failure necessitates a resit of the same station under identical circumstances, albeit at a reduced fee. Conversely, a complete failure mandates a comprehensive resit of the entire OSCE, incurring the full examination cost.

Discussions with experienced Filipino UK nurses who underwent OSCE resits revealed that NHS trusts generally offer support for candidates undergoing resits, covering fees and providing additional training and study time for a second attempt. However, support might diminish beyond the second attempt, with trusts often indicating that failure to pass on the second try could halt the employment process, potentially leading to Home Office intervention and curtailment of residency rights.

To avoid OSCE failure, several tips were suggested, including ample practice, time management, utilization of learning resources, familiarity with marking criteria, calming techniques, and acclimatization to the new environment. Despite its familiarity to Filipino nurses, thorough preparation remains crucial for OSCE success, as it represents the final step toward fulfilling the dream of becoming a registered UK nurse.

Source: Filipino UK Nurses Community

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