Home OSCE Practical Examination EVIDENCE BASE PRACTICE – OSCE saline vrs tap water

EVIDENCE BASE PRACTICE – OSCE saline vrs tap water

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Saline versus Tap water – marking criteria

  1. Summarizes the main findings of the article summary and draws conclusions, making recommendations for practice.
  • Writes clearly and legibly.
  • Informs the patient that trials comparing the occurrences of wound infections when cleaned with sterile saline or tap water have shown no difference between the two.
  • Advises the patient that there is a lack of available evidence on the effects of water or saline on wound healing.
  • Makes the patient aware that there are no differences in patient satisfaction in either group. However, there was a lack of robust evidence on the instances of pain experienced by patients, or on adverse events.
  • Highlights to the patient that there were no standard criteria for assessing wound infection across the trials, which limited the ability to pool the data across studies and limited the results.
  • Explains to the patient that tap water has been recommended as a cost-effective option for wound cleaning.

Sample scenario

Situation: At Leeds NHS Hospital, patient Adeola is concerned about her wound and believes it should be cleaned with sterile saline instead of tap water. As the nurse responsible for wound assessment and dressing, how will you address this situation based on the given criteria?

Your answer

I will inform Adeola that studies comparing wound infections when cleaned with sterile saline versus tap water indicate no discernible difference between the two methods.

I will inform Adeola that the existing evidence regarding the impact of water or saline on wound healing is limited.

I will make Adeola aware that there is no difference in patient satisfaction between the two cleaning methods. However, there is a scarcity of strong evidence regarding the occurrence of pain or adverse events.

I will highlight to Adeola that there were no standard criteria for assessing wound infection across the trials, which limited the ability to pool the data across studies and limited the results.

I will clarify to Adeola that tap water is suggested as a cost-effective alternative for wound cleaning.

2 COMMENTS

  1. Hi there just wanted to give you a quick heads up.
    The text in your article seem to be running off the screen in Ie.
    I’m not sure if this is a formatting issue or something to do with internet browser compatibility
    but I thought I’d post to let you know. The design look
    great though! Hope you get the issue resolved soon. Thanks

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